The 25 Best Films of the 21st Century, List by New York Times (Part 2)

Posted 06/17/2017 5339 0

Just recently, New York Times has listed down their 25 best movies of the century so far! Let's check them all out!

 

14. L’Enfant (2006, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne)

After giving birth, teenage Sonia (Déborah François) returns home to find that her boyfriend, irresponsible petty criminal Bruno (Jérémie Segard), has sublet their apartment. Sonia tracks Bruno down on the street, and after the couple spends the night together, they decide to start a new life with the baby. But the next morning, Bruno sells their child for cash, sending Sonia into shock. Shaken by her decision to press charges against him, Bruno sets out to retrieve the baby.

 

15. White Material (2010, Claire Denis)

As the owner of a coffee plantation in Africa, Maria (Isabelle Huppert) wants only to see her business through the harvest, no matter what's happening around it. Instead of fleeing what seems to be a dangerous conflict, she puts her faith in a rebel leader called The Boxer (Isaach De Bankolé). But as civil wars rip through the continent, and the area becomes increasingly dangerous, Maria may be putting both herself and her family in danger by attempting to weather the storm.

 

16. Munich (2005, Steven Spielberg)

After the murder of 11 Israeli athletes and their coach at the 1972 Olympics, the Israeli government secretly assigns Avner Kaufman (Eric Bana) to carry out a series of strategic retaliations. With the help of a driver (Daniel Craig), a forger (Hanns Zischler), a bomb-maker (Mathieu Kassovitz) and a former soldier (Ciarán Hinds), Avner conducts a worldwide operation, targeting 11 individuals. As the assassinations pile up, Avner begins to doubt the morality of his actions.

 

17. Three Times (2006, Hou Hsiao-hsien)

Three romantic tales take place in different eras. In "A Time for Love," set in 1966, a soldier (Chen Chang) meets an alluring pool-hall hostess (Shu Qi). "A Time for Freedom," set in 1911, focuses on a courtesan's relationship with a man during the Japanese occupation of Taiwan. In "A Time for Youth," set in 2005, a singer forsakes her female lover for a photographer.

 

18. The Gleaners and I (2000, Agnès Varda)

An 1867 painting by Jean-Francois Millet inspired septuagenarian documentarian Agnes Varda to cross the French countryside to videotape people who scavenge. Taking everything from surplus in the fields, to rubbish in trashcans, to oysters washed up after a storm, the "gleaners" range from those sadly in need to those hoping to recreate the community activity of centuries past, and still others who use whatever they find to cobble together a rough art. Highlighted by Varda's amusing narration.

 

19. Mad Max: Fury Road (2015,George Miller)

Years after the collapse of civilization, the tyrannical Immortan Joe enslaves apocalypse survivors inside the desert fortress the Citadel. When the warrior Imperator Furiosa (Charlize Theron) leads the despot's five wives in a daring escape, she forges an alliance with Max Rockatansky (Tom Hardy), a loner and former captive. Fortified in the massive, armored truck the War Rig, they try to outrun the ruthless warlord and his henchmen in a deadly high-speed chase through the Wasteland.

 

20. Moonlight (2016, Barry Jenkins)

A look at three defining chapters in the life of Chiron, a young black man growing up in Miami. His epic journey to manhood is guided by the kindness, support and love of the community that helps raise him.

 

21. Wendy and Lucy (2008, Kelly Reichardt)

Wendy (Michelle Williams), a near-penniless drifter, is traveling to Alaska in search of work, and her only companion is her dog, Lucy. Already perilously close to losing everything, Wendy hits a bigger bump in the road when her old car breaks down and she is arrested for shoplifting dog food. When she posts bail and returns to retrieve Lucy, she finds that the dog is gone, prompting a frantic search for her pet.

 

22. I’m Not There (2007, Todd Haynes)

Several actors portray legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan at different stages in his personal life and career. In 1959 a guitar-strumming youth (Marcus Carl Franklin) rides the rails, calling himself "Guthrie." Then a man named Jack (Christian Bale) emerges in New York's Greenwich Village, followed by "Robbie (Heath Ledger)," Jude (Cate Blanchett) and other personalities.

 

23. Silent Light (2008, Carlos Reygadas)

Johan (Cornelio Wall), a married Mennonite who maintains a quiet, simplistic lifestyle in rural Mexico, experiences a moral dilemma as a result of his passionate, and torturously public, affair with Marianne (Maria Pankratz), a neighbor. As he goes through the ritualistic motions of his daily life in a bucolic landscape, he is forced to weigh his love for Marianne against the survival of his marriage, his family and his deeply felt religious beliefs.

 

24. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Michel Gondry)

After a painful breakup, Clementine (Kate Winslet) undergoes a procedure to erase memories of her former boyfriend Joel (Jim Carrey) from her mind. When Joel discovers that Clementine is going to extremes to forget their relationship, he undergoes the same procedure and slowly begins to forget the woman that he loved. Directed by former music video director Michel Gondry, the visually arresting film explores the intricacy of relationships and the pain of loss.

 

25. The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005, Judd Apatow)

Andy Stitzer (Steve Carell) is an amiable single guy who works at a big-box store. Living alone, 40-year-old Andy spends his free time playing video games and curating his action-figure collection. Despite his age, Andy has never had sex, so his friends, including the laid-back David (Paul Rudd), push Andy towards losing his virginity. While attempting to get over his awkwardness around female customers, Andy meets local shop owner Trish (Catherine Keener), and they begin a tentative romance.

 

 

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